Jump to content

jigga009

Members
  • Content Count

    70
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    1

jigga009 last won the day on September 16

jigga009 had the most liked content!

About jigga009

  • Rank
    Advanced Member

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male

Recent Profile Visitors

The recent visitors block is disabled and is not being shown to other users.

  1. jigga009

    ECU no longer firing 2 cylinders...

    I use MSD's coil and wires, but that's it.
  2. jigga009

    ECU no longer firing 2 cylinders...

    Stevieturbo, thanks for your response! I don't believe it is an alternator issue, as logs showed system voltage to be utterly normal all the way to the end. I'm not ruling out an alternator issue though, but unless the log is telling me porkies, the log shows that the alternator was working, with voltage in the 13.7-13.8V range all the way to the end. In addition, I do have warnings on my dash set to warn me if and when voltage drops below charging voltage or above normal voltages. Nothing from what I can see in the log was out of the ordinary. Sadly, the shop I visited today with the alternator could only test it if it came out of a specific vehicle... Since it is not a normal production alternator off a specific vehicle, they were unable to program their computer with the details on the alternator in order to run the test. They did not believe though that it sounds like an alternator failure, given that data logs showed that it was charging all the way to the end. They thought I would notice other electrical-related issues such as issues with the radio. My battery did pass testing with flying colours though! The whole CDI vs IGN1A inductive coil debate is old and about as divisive as talking politics and religion on a first date. I have my reasons for running a CDI setup, and I am well-aware of the capabilities of the stock Subaru COP, and have heard the arguments from those who are pro-IGN1A as well. I don't think anyone is grossly wrong at all. Both solutions have their pluses and minuses. All I can say is that I'm not one to complicate things any more than I need to, and think long and hard before leaving the safety and reliability of OEM for anything aftermarket. Not to be cryptic, but putting one and one together, you already have an idea of the limits of the Subaru COP system, and I've already described what I experienced when I found that I was reaching the limits of the Subaru COP setup, so one might deduce that I am dealing with a slightly more serious setup than average. You are correct about the use of crimping in those industries I learned about the space vehicle use of crimping connections from a former NASA technician who chimed in on a different forum I came upon, weighing in on the debate. In addition, all the videos I saw online made crimping look even easier than soldering, and I was feeling lazy that day also.. I'll freely admit though that I have been soldering for much longer than I have been crimping :s Regardless, my badly crimped connections were not the cause this issue I am seeing, as I tried starting the car again today. I am looking into other things now such as engine grounding connections, which might affect both CDI systems and also explain why it seems as if the starter motor is rather slow, even when powered with a fully charged AGM battery producing over 1000CCA. Even if grounding is found not to be the cause either, at least it gives me a chance to spruce those areas of the car up that I have not touched in a while.
  3. jigga009

    ECU no longer firing 2 cylinders...

    As mentioned earlier, there is a reason why I had to go with a CDI setup over the stock COP; I was bumping into its limits, and the only way forwards in my situation was to switch to a CDI system. I would have been all too happy to stick with the OEM COP if its limits were a bit higher, and the transient demands it was putting on my electrical system (even with a 160amp alternator) was not dragging the system voltage dangerously low. Lord knows I prefer the drivability associated with the stock COP over CDI, but the COP was showing signs of not being appropriate at the power levels being run. I do agree though that they can be quite annoying from a reliability perspective, and with the longer duration of each spark with an inductive ignition system, low-down drivability/torque is actually better imo with a COP setup. With that said, CDI systems do bring certain benefits that are hard to ignore once you have outstayed your welcome on the stock Subaru COP system, and it isn't as if people don't have issues with stock coils acting up either. I do hear that Nissan R35 GTR coils might be a lot more capable than anything Subaru has though, so perhaps somehow retrofitting those coils might be a solution for reliability while being able to light off the plugs. Mini-update for the day: I didn't have too much time today, but I was able to dismantle the old crimp connections I made a couple of weeks ago as per CJ's suggestion and properly solder on some eyelets instead. I unfortunately did not take any pictures as I went, but after looking online at proper crimping examples and comparing them to what I thought was good enough, I have to admit that I likely won't bother crimping anything again. I should have soldered these connections, but I was too lazy at the time to bust out my soldering station. The other thing I noticed is that 2 weeks after installing the crimp connections in the first place, all 3 wires (main fuse box 12V+, CDI box #1 12V+, and CDI box #2 12V+) were developing corrosion (green residue on the exposed copper strands within the crimps). I could not see this before now due to the plastic sheath on the eyelet ring terminals that covers everything behind the ring. I cut off the affected wire and exposed fresh sections to solder into eyelets, cleaned them with isopropyl alcohol then tinned them up and used flux to allow for good solder flow into the eyelets. Everything has adhesive heat shrink tubing to keep moisture out. One last thing I will do tomorrow before attempting to firing it up is to apply some Stabilant 22a to the eyelet connections within their fuse box. I should be able to try firing the car up tomorrow. It's a bit late in the evening right now, and the car is rather loud.
  4. jigga009

    ECU no longer firing 2 cylinders...

    Hi CJ, thanks for your response! And I am thinking that your theory might be on the money...I'll explain. The battery in my car has been relocated to the boot, since there is no room in the engine bay these days. I have a 2AWG wire going from the battery positive to the starter motor, and then another 2 AWG line from the starter motor to a "2 AWG in/2AWG out" distribution block with 150A inline fuse mounted on the side of the engine bay just underneath the main fuse/relay box in the engine bay. Coming out of that distribution block were 2 10AWG wires that feed each of the CDI boxes and an 8AWG wire that feeds the main OEM fuse box in the engine bay. All 3 wires were sort of scrunched together and inserted into the outlet of the distribution block. The car worked fine like this, but I wasn't completely happy with the solution since it always looked like the conglomeration of wires was always on the verge of popping out and looked to be full of dirt. The car ran around like this since it was put together a few years ago, with CDI boxes going bad every once in a while, but as I maintained before, i had always been able to fire all plugs at once in order to see which box had an issue. I was happy with the function of the car, but never really liked how the shop sort of twisted all 3 wires together and shoved them into the outlet of the distribution block. A couple of weeks ago I made what I thought was a slight change with the intent of cleaning things up a little bit - I purchased one of these: https://www.bluesea.com/products/5045/ST_Blade_Compact_Fuse_Blocks_-_4_Circuits And then removed the old power distribution block with integrated 150a fuse and connected the 2AWG wire from the boot of the car to the bottom post of the new fuse block pictured in the link using a 2 AWG set screw ring terminal, and then crimped some eyelets onto the 2 10 AWG wires that fed each CDI box, and one on the 8AWG wire that went to the main OEM fuse/relay box. I then installed all 3 wires onto the new fuse box. The fuse box was then mounted just underneath the OEM fuse/relay box where the old "2AWG in/2AWG out" distribution block was located before. Since the wire going to the main fuse box was 8AWG, I used a 40Amp fuse for that, and for the CDI circuits, they each received 30A fuses since they were 10AWG wires. This matched the 30A rating of the in-line fuses the CDI 12V power wire came with. I did crimp eyelets onto each of these wires, and while the crimps did feel secure when I made them a few weeks ago, I did notice on Sunday that they did not seem as tight when I was busy scrambling around trying to figure out what was going on with the car on the side of the highway. It did not occur to me though that they might be loose to the point of causing such an issue though, but I may have been wrong. I typically solder all of my connections (and all of the other connections mated the CDI boxes to the car when installed professionally were soldered), but for some reason I thought I would give crimping wires a go, since it seems to be an accepted way of making an electrical connection. So in essence, I introduced crimped connections to a setup that used soldering for all previously existing connections. It might be that the vibration the car has undergone within the past couple of weeks of use shook the connections I made loose. As you theorized, both CDI boxes receive their 12V power from the battery via the crimped eyelet connection to the fusebox in the link above, and the crimp connection may not be the best, I freely admit. The CDI boxes also receive a switched 12V source, and I was able to confirm with a testlight that each box was connected (soldered) to switched 12V supply. All other inputs from the ECU were tested and found present and functional. The only connection I forgot to scrutinize were the crimped connections I introduced to the system, which as you theorized, provide the main power to the boxes. They are the only non-soldered connections in the entire system, and also the latest additions to what was a working system. :/ I'll break out the soldering station and get them soldered tomorrow morning Thanks for your suggestion!!
  5. jigga009

    ECU no longer firing 2 cylinders...

    Adam, the CDI system is in fact able to fire both channels simultaneously, or close to simultaneously (in cases where the leading and trailing spark plugs fire close together) as each channel has its own storage capacitor... I found this information in the instruction manual.
  6. jigga009

    ECU no longer firing 2 cylinders...

    I'm guessing this is what my tuner was referring to when he mentioned that I would have to make some adjustments within the map if I decided to switch back to the standard Subaru ignition setup; dwell settings... I was under the impression though that dwell settings are a little redundant with a CDI setup though? Since the module itself controls how long it charges for?
  7. jigga009

    ECU no longer firing 2 cylinders...

    Yeh mine is set at 3.0ms all the way from 10-16v at all RPM levels.
  8. jigga009

    ECU no longer firing 2 cylinders...

    Hmm... But is that with a CDI ignition system though or with the stock COP inductive setup though? I am curious as to whether I could actually allow my CDI boxes to run cooler by running a smaller dwell that is closer to zero without throwing off the map.... hmm...
  9. jigga009

    ECU no longer firing 2 cylinders...

    Looking through the manual of my CDI, dwell appears to be set properly at a "non-zero value", and without change with different voltage levels within the ECU tables, so I would *guess* that as long as the value is not zero, the CDI could care less what value it is? I hope someone with more knowledge can chime in here and bless me with some knowledge
  10. jigga009

    ECU no longer firing 2 cylinders...

    Good point regarding the CDI boxes. I will check the CDI manual to see if there is anything outlined in there regarding input over-voltage protections. With that said, the log from the ECU shows that system voltage was as high as 13.9V shortly after I fired the car up at the start of the trip, and was at 13.7V about 48 mins later when things started shutting down. I would know immediately if my system voltage goes above about 14.8V through my dash, and no warnings came in, confirmed by the log I have. I'm honestly not sure whether the dwell setting on the ECU could be making them overheat. You make a really good point though, and I'm going to have to look into a bit deeper. Thanks very much for this. Looking at the dwell table on my car, at 14V it is set for 3.0ms. I'll admit that dwell is an aspect that I have not read up on, so I'm unsure as to what this means in the context of my particular setup. I will look into it though.
  11. jigga009

    ECU no longer firing 2 cylinders...

    Hi Neil, thanks for your response! You must be watching me because I was just starting to look through the manual of the ECU to find any circumstances under which it would shut the engine down aside from rev limiters and the like! Voltage was around 13.5V when things started going off-line. Yes, on mine, the exhaust comes down right where the ECU lives. In addition, the size of my downpipe is such that it comes within very close proximity to the firewall of the car. It is 4 inches in diameter, if that gives you a hint. Battery voltage was in the mid 13's V range when it shut down. I have warnings for over-voltage on my AIM dash display to warn me of anything out of the usual with respect to voltage. Looking through the log of the event, it really does look as if nothing is wrong, and someone just started turning off off the spark plugs while the car was in motion. I was stumped, but then only now just recalled that in previous summers when I first got my V88 years ago, I had in fact experienced something similar, and I quickly learned to use AC when running around for long periods of time in order to sidestep the issue.
  12. jigga009

    ECU no longer firing 2 cylinders...

    Something that occurred to me today while poking through my utterly normal log of the event was something that I used to experience with my old Vipec V88 during summer months under very similar circumstances to the day the car stopped running with the G4+.. During summer months with my V88, it had a habit of shutting down the car on hot summer days (usually this time of the year) if I drove for long periods of time without cooling the interior of the car with AC or with windows down. Once I let the car cool sit and off for a period of time, it would start up again like nothing ever happened, and then start shutting cylinders down again if I drove for a while again without AC or without windows down. I was able to deduce back then that the ECU might have been getting too warm underneath the passenger footwell where there is no airflow and the downpipe of my turbo passes nearby in the engine bay. I had not experienced the same thing with the G4+ since I only picked it up about 6 months ago during winter months, but this is my first summer running this ECU and when I think about it, the conditions seem a bit too similar for comfort, with ambient temps in the 28 degrees C range with clear skies on that particular day. I imagine that it was even hotter in the interior of the car since the windows were not open either. I checked my log, and I was running the car on the highway for about 99% of my trip without the AC on. I don't drive with windows down on the highway either due to wind noise, and it lets me better hear if there is a change in engine noise so I know to shut things down myself. When the engine stopped running this time, I had felt uncomfortable enough in the car to turn the AC on to the first fan speed, and precisely about 1 minute later, the engine itself started shutting down. I know that the ECU's are burned in at the factory and the like at much higher temps at the factory, which is probably why everything works like normal after giving everything a chance to cool off, but this was definitely something I experienced consistently with my old V88 in the passenger footwell during summer months, and perhaps the G4+ is the same given that it is located in the same position in the car? I can't say what temps the old V88 logged when it used to shut down because I was never logging when it happened, but I do remember that it was at ambient temps similar to what they were when I experienced my issue this time also, and the mechanical setup of the car is identical between the ECUs. It might explain why my logs look utterly normal prior to the engine shut-down event. I'll be installing another set of plugs into the car and attempting to start it a little later today if I have time or tomorrow, so it should be interesting to see if it runs, given that there have been zero mechanical changes (aside from plugs) on the car between when it stopped working and when I fire it up again. I'll keep everyone posted.
  13. jigga009

    ECU no longer firing 2 cylinders...

    Thanks for the response Adam, I'm honestly at a bit of a loss as to why the thing stopped in the first place if the Link is firing each plug sequentially. I definitely recall you making the comment about not thinking that many CDIs can fire all channels simultaneously, but I now better understand what you meant. To partly answer your question (because it definitely came up during the conversation with the manufacturer yesterday), the CDI does in fact have an independent capacitor for each channel. It is for this reason they are sure that their boxes work properly since I can command each channel on in isolation, and each channel definitely fires the plug (sequentially when cranking the engine and through the ECU's test mode). My plan for today includes installing the plugs into the engine heads and actually see if it runs with the G4+. If not, I will try the same on the stock ECU to see what happens. As far as why the engine stopped in the first place, I am not sure...If you look at the log I included of the event, you would see that I was literally cruising at speed when all of a sudden it seemed to shut down by itself. The only reason why I initially suspected a CDI box issue is because that is the typical failure mode I've experienced with them... You would be driving, when all of a sudden you drop one or more cylinders and the car can no longer carry on at speed. Luckily, I was data logging all channels directly to my laptop at the time it happened, so I do have a record of what the ECU was doing and seeing on all channels, but I'll be the first to admit that I am not skilled enough to see anything that is glaringly wrong in the log. I have included the log in my second post in case something jumps out at you? - Datalog from when engine stopped running I'm going to follow up with them today regarding the second part of your question - whether the CDI can actually fire both channels simultaneously. My guess after seeing what I've seen so far with the existing CDI's that were in the car when the issue hit, and when I switched in my spare box is that it cannot (just as you predicted), but I will wait and see what they say about that part. I will say though that they were very curious initially as to how exactly I was triggering the CDI to fire all plugs at the same time. It was when I explained that it was through a standalone ignition test mode and which standalone it was that the gears started to turn in their heads. Even then, they wanted to know exactly how the ignition test mode on the G4+ worked..something I could not answer, except to say that it signals a firing at a frequency of 10Hz to the CDI box which I have confirmed is definitely reaching the box on both channels. I will let you know what they say with respect to being able to fire both channels simultaneously. Hi Neil, thanks for your response. It is a new-age Subaru bugeye car, but the coil on plugs are long-gone. They had to be pulled because the stock ignition system was causing some rather large transient voltage drops in the car at elevated power levels. Switching ignition systems was the only way to stop this happening. The stock ECU does have the ability to run the engine with the CDI system though, but I have to run the CDI's in their non-restriking mode.
  14. jigga009

    ECU no longer firing 2 cylinders...

    Cj, thanks very much for the suggestion.. I'll try this tomorrow and see what happens. I should be able to switch the wires on each bank around, but won't be able to switch between banks without some major rewiring. Another frustrating and confusing mini update from today: I was in touch today some more with the manufacturer of the CDI i'm using in order to obtain an RMA#, and a different tech wanted me to describe everything from the top again. While he was more than willing to give me an RMA to send them in, he was confident that there is something different about the way the G4+ calls for individual cylinder fire within its test mode compared to what it does when you actually run the car, or when you turn on all channels. I asked why it was they believed this, and they stated that it is because if each channel works in isolation (which they do), the CDI is fine. They mentioned that once I figure that out, I would know why it is that it "appears" that each CDI is not firing off both of their respective channels. To test, they had me revert to the stock ECU while keeping the CDI boxes in place and crank the engine to see whether I am still only getting one cylinder on each bank firing, and lo and behold, during cranking on the stock ECU, all 4 plugs were firing. I was stunned. I then tried the exact same thing on the G4+, actually cranking the engine and observing the plugs, and it also fired all 4 spark plugs sequentially just as on the stock ECU. Now that I established that both the stock ECU and the G4+ were both capable of firing all individual spark plugs sequentially through the same CDI boxes that were on the car when it stopped, I decided to try the G4+'s ignition mode again in order to see what happens, and sure enough, as the manufacturer of the CDI guessed, something changed. It looked just as it looked before - as if the engine was again not running on 4 spark plugs. I could command on each individual plug in isolation just fine with a nice spark, but could not observe a spark in all 4 plugs if I turned all cylinders on and sat back to watch.
  15. jigga009

    ECU no longer firing 2 cylinders...

    New update for those watching in the background! I ran further tests using my new-found toy, the LED test light (Thanks Adam!!). After back-probing the harness of the CDI boxes that serve the left and right banks of the engine, I was able to determine that the signal to fire the coils is in fact reaching the CDI boxes from the ECU, so given the following bits of info that I have accumulated so far: - ECU is definitely firing its ignition outputs (confirmed by back-probing at the ECU itself) - I am able to command on each spark plug by itself (suggesting that the wiring pathway between the ECU and the CDI boxes is fine) -Signal from the ECU is reaching the CDI boxes on both sides of the engine (I back-probed the connector going into each box for the signal from the ECU, and the light blinked at the roughly 10Hz that it did when I back-probed at the ECU connector inside the car.) - Coils test in spec - Spark plug wires test in spec - I used new spark plugs just to ensure that spark plugs are not the cause of the issues I am experiencing. - CDI boxes are in fact receiving a full 12.87V from my battery - I can't actually measure the output from the CDI to the coils since it is somewhere in the 500V range, but I can observe whether a spark is jumping at the plug though. I'd conclude that as unlikely as it seems, both the CDI boxes are at fault. There is a bit of a plot twist to all of this though which made the scenario very confusing from the start: 1) I swapped what I thought was a known good box into the car, and the problem persisted, leading me to prematurely rule out issues with the CDI bo. After back-probing this spare box and observing that the ECU is in fact commanding it to fire, AND that it is receiving appropriate voltage from the car, it would seem that my spare CDI box was a dud also. 2) Both boxes on the car appeared to have failed in similar manners, but to different extents... Box 1 can fire each cylinder individually, but when placed on the driver's side of the car, can only fire "1.5" plugs (fires one strongly, and the other one weakly). When on the passenger side it can only fire one cylinder when both cylinders are commanded to fire. Box 2 can fire each cylinder individually, but when placed on the driver's side of the car, can only fire 1 plug when both are commanded on. When on the passenger side of the car, it can only fire one plug when both plugs are commanded to fire. My "spare" box appears to have the same issue - can fire each plug on its own, but only one plug out of two when commanded to fire them both. I suspect that in essence, I had been running on 1.5 cylinders on one side of the engine and the full 2 cylinders on the other side for a long time without noticing much loss in power, and never really noticed it until the box that was running at full strength failed and dropped down to 1 cylinder, dropping me down to 2.5 cylinders out of 4, which I could definitely notice, and caused the car to lose the ability to maintain speed. If there is anything that anyone thinks I should check in addition that could change my conclusions, I'd love your suggestions.
×