Jump to content
tiago

Not able to connect to Link G4+ after a bad wiring - Is it dead?

Recommended Posts

Hey guys,

There's some way to check if the ecu is burned?
Like a check with the multimeter?
 
After a bad wiring (Subaru Sti 1999 V6) I burned a fuse (SBF n5 30A) and after that I am not able to connect to the link anymore. 
With all wires connected to the ECU, if I turn the key to on the rpm (on the dash) is not moving like before.
 
After turn the key on and move back to off the dash lights start to blink like some energy was being sending (check the video link please).
How can I confirm that it's burned (or something) before I send it back to for repair?
 
Last, check the picture, is this little "dot" on the transistors some bad indicator? Is it normal?

IMG_6932 (1).jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On subaru's the dash lights staying on after the key is turned off is usually caused by bad grounds, and it means a bunch of systems are grounding out through places they shouldnt be. 

The real question is why did your fuse blow? if you overloaded a circuit with too big of a stereo thats one thing, but if you have a short somewhere still in the car all kinds of things could be happening.

do you see the power LED on the link light up when you turn the key on? have you checked power & ground to the ECU is still ok?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As CJ says it is most likely a wiring problem based on the dash lights.  Quickest way to confirm the ecu is ok is to remove it from the car and power it up on the bench with a couple of test leads.  Easiest way to power it up is to find the big barrel shaped tvs diode near the main header, clip +12v to the leg on the striped end and clip ground onto the other end.  You will see the led light come on if all ok.

The marks on the mosfets in your picture are just air bubbles or runs in the conformal coating.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, Adamw said:

As CJ says it is most likely a wiring problem based on the dash lights.  Quickest way to confirm the ecu is ok is to remove it from the car and power it up on the bench with a couple of test leads.  Easiest way to power it up is to find the big barrel shaped tvs diode near the main header, clip +12v to the leg on the striped end and clip ground onto the other end.  You will see the led light come on if all ok.

The marks on the mosfets in your picture are just air bubbles or runs in the conformal coating.

Did the test powering the big diode as on the picture but there's no led on.

I think its dead :(

Thanks guys, I think now the last think to do is send it back to be repaired.

IMG_7046.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Stevieturbo said:

What exactly happened that caused the issue in the first place ?

 

Can you plug in a standard ecu, just to prove the car side of things is now healthy again ?

 

I'm doing an intake swap (intake, throttle body, fuel injection and coils) from a newest model and wired something wrong.

I wired a negative from the ecu to a positive. After that the fuse blown and everything stops to work.

I double checked all the new wires and now it's ok.
The car will not run with the oem ecu anymore unless I swap the intake back.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So the next question then is, with the old intake (that works with an OEM ECU), does the link still work? I'm guessing not given you test with power straight into the ECU, but you will need to fix that issue on the new intake before you connect up a fixed Link or you might break that too.

At a guess, you didnt have the ground from the left of the chassis (by the fuel lines) connected. On the older intakes it bolts through one of the intercooler mounts and if you dont have it connected, you get that dash staying on issue as its some important part of grounding the chassis.There is one on the right behind/above the air box which can either go to an intake bolt or to the top of the heads, depending on who last installed your engine.

Other thing to consider, is are you using your original wiring and connecting it to the new intake, or did your new intake come with all the wiring attached? That wiring loom contains 95% of the engine->ECU connections, and i'd imagine the pinouts are different between years.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, cj said:

So the next question then is, with the old intake (that works with an OEM ECU), does the link still work? I'm guessing not given you test with power straight into the ECU, but you will need to fix that issue on the new intake before you connect up a fixed Link or you might break that too.

At a guess, you didnt have the ground from the left of the chassis (by the fuel lines) connected. On the older intakes it bolts through one of the intercooler mounts and if you dont have it connected, you get that dash staying on issue as its some important part of grounding the chassis.There is one on the right behind/above the air box which can either go to an intake bolt or to the top of the heads, depending on who last installed your engine.

Other thing to consider, is are you using your original wiring and connecting it to the new intake, or did your new intake come with all the wiring attached? That wiring loom contains 95% of the engine->ECU connections, and i'd imagine the pinouts are different between years.

At the time that I did the video the all the intake wires was disconnected (the 2 big connectors near the battery) it could explain the ground problem. I was more interested to test if the Link was ok and wanted to check all the wires with a multimeter before connect it again just to be safe.

I'm not using the original wiring. I am using the new wiring that comes with the new intake. I opened the new wiring and removed all unnecessary connectors/wires and matched (on the 2 big connectors) all the wires with my old one.
The new intake has a wiring for the map that my old one didn't that I will use. Also the TPS and idle control valve is different. The new ICV has 3 wires and the old one 6. So I will free up aux (5, 6, 7 and 8) by using the new ICV. 

Aux 5 - will be used on the new MAP
Aux 6 - For the ICV
Aux 7 and 8 for the Fan Relay 1 and 2

And the Aux - Ign 3 and Ign 4 (that was used by the Fan Relay 1 and 2) will be used for the coils to be able to use Direct Spark.

As you said the pinouts is very different and that was my error (shame on me). I did a try using the new intake wires before check everything and on that moment that the fuse blown and the link stopped to work.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If it is a 3 wire ISCV then it might need 2 auxs.  If this is the case, it will need aux 1 and 2 as they are the outputs which support master slave ISCV. 

HTH, 

Richard. 

IMG_20200102_094653.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Depends on what year 

 

ver3-4 3 wire Iscv 

ver 5-6 6 wire iscv

 

presume it has ver 5/6 inlet he would have went to newage set up with coil on plugs setup with later throttle bony with combined iscv

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, Richard Hill said:

If it is a 3 wire ISCV then it might need 2 auxs.  If this is the case, it will need aux 1 and 2 as they are the outputs which support master slave ISCV. 

HTH, 

Richard. 

Based on the base map for the Subaru V7 it's using only one Aux for the ISC.
Did some research and looks like the 3 wires Subaru ISC work like a 2 wire valve.

Take a look:

 

Capture.PNG

8 hours ago, neil brown said:

Depends on what year 

 

ver3-4 3 wire Iscv 

ver 5-6 6 wire iscv

 

presume it has ver 5/6 inlet he would have went to newage set up with coil on plugs setup with later throttle bony with combined iscv

Correct, I'm using the newest model that has the throttle body combined with ISC and MAP.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you have a plug play ecu, it makes the most sense to retain the wiring loom that is supposed to be on that vehicle unless there is an extremely good reason to change it.

And changing only part of it is asking for trouble. If changing coils etc...it would be easier and safer just to modify those aspects of the wiring that only need changed to accommodate those coils.

Why are you changing the intake and/or that wiring ? It wont make any difference from a performance point of view.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×
×
  • Create New...