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cj

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  1. Thanks
    cj got a reaction from Gsab in Low Oil Pressure protection strategy question   
    The warning light is simple enough - configure an aux output as GP on/off, label it "Oil pressure warning" or similar, and set the condition to "oil pressure < 30kpa" or whatever you decide is a good level. This output will be connected to the ground side of your warning light in most cases. 
    the ignition cut you can do a couple ways but you'll probably end up setting a GP RPM limit (under engine protection). turn on GP limit 1, then in the GP limit 1 table, change the Y axis to "oil pressure". You now set the rpm limit to 10000 or something higher than you ever hit in all cells where you want the engine to run normally, and either zero or your idle rpm in all the "failure" cells (ie the low pressure+high RPM cells). you can also do some logging of normal oil pressure and tweak the table using this so that the threshold for "failure" is just below normal at every RPM. If you set the limit to 0 you will stall the engine. There is a startup lockout timer in the GP limit settings that you may need to set so you can actually get the engine to start and have the oil pressure stabilise before it starts limiting it.
    If you have e-throttle you have another option of setting a second ethrottle target table where the target value never goes above 5 or 10% (or 0 if you want to stall it). You then set the condition for switching to table 2 to be the status of your warning light. This way you can also add in low fuel pressure or any other protection conditions you want to cover by adding them as conditions for the warning light (which could also be a virtual aux if you want the warning light to use different conditions than the thottle table swap.
  2. Thanks
    cj got a reaction from Andreasq in Rb25det wont open injectors   
    can you please post your pclr (config file) and a log of you trying to start it? 
    First up, check that your injection mode is not still set to "disabled". 
    How do you know they are not firing? Have you connected a test light in place of an injector, or are you just basing it no "no start + spark plugs are dry"? Its quite possible your fuel config just needs bigger numbers
  3. Thanks
    cj got a reaction from Andreasq in Rb25det wont open injectors   
    A couple big things
    1) your map sensor calibration seems wrong. It should be approx equal to BAP when the engine is not running (so around 100). yours reads 7kpa absolute which is definitely wrong.
    2) Your fuel table looks like it was originally for a traditional mode setup. Try copying the entire of fuel table1 from the monsoon base map instead.
    3) As Henryy said, with Ethanol you need much more crank enrichment (even with a sensible fuel table). Probably in the 200-300% range at 10-20*C
  4. Like
    cj got a reaction from ZipTieTECH in Sensor Grounds (5V and 12v Sensors, speed sensors, knock....ETC))   
    You can connect both 5v and 12v sensors (and VR sensors etc that have varying voltage output) all to the same sensor ground. 
    The reason to chose 1 type of ground over another is not input voltage, but more:
    1) how stable does the signal need to be for the engine to run well (crank trigger = really important, any of the temp sensors = not a big issue if the signal bounces around a few percent). And as part of this, will a ground offset cause an incorrect reading that still looks legit. (eg voltage offset on any analog sensor)
    2) How much load is expected to go through the ground circuit. eg do not use a sensor ground as the ground side for a vtec solenoid or anything like that.
    As long as everything on the sensor grounds is low *current* then adding a flex fuel sensor to sensor ground wouldnt hurt, and generally anything that is an ECU *input* you would lean towards putting on the sensor ground circuits. But if you do see issues that seem like sensor noise once you add it, you can probably move the flex sensor to use a direct ground and not see too many issues. These dont report an analog output anyway so should work just fine with slightly noisy voltage/ground.
  5. Like
    cj got a reaction from Davidv in Sensor Grounds (5V and 12v Sensors, speed sensors, knock....ETC))   
    You can connect both 5v and 12v sensors (and VR sensors etc that have varying voltage output) all to the same sensor ground. 
    The reason to chose 1 type of ground over another is not input voltage, but more:
    1) how stable does the signal need to be for the engine to run well (crank trigger = really important, any of the temp sensors = not a big issue if the signal bounces around a few percent). And as part of this, will a ground offset cause an incorrect reading that still looks legit. (eg voltage offset on any analog sensor)
    2) How much load is expected to go through the ground circuit. eg do not use a sensor ground as the ground side for a vtec solenoid or anything like that.
    As long as everything on the sensor grounds is low *current* then adding a flex fuel sensor to sensor ground wouldnt hurt, and generally anything that is an ECU *input* you would lean towards putting on the sensor ground circuits. But if you do see issues that seem like sensor noise once you add it, you can probably move the flex sensor to use a direct ground and not see too many issues. These dont report an analog output anyway so should work just fine with slightly noisy voltage/ground.
  6. Thanks
    cj got a reaction from Fotis in E throttle Jetski   
    Yep, actuator means the motor itself on the throttle. This will be wired to ethrottle+ and -
    Internal to the ECU, these 2 outputs are special in that they draw their power from a separate supply (the B5 pin mentioned above). The ECU expects there to be a relay (as per the above diagram) that is feeding power to B5, and it also expects to be able to cut off that power by disabling an aux output - so one has to be configured for this.
  7. Like
    cj got a reaction from Nadeerawick in Injector Setup   
    I havent double checked those values for you , but if you copied those values from a hondata base map they are probably pretty accurate. I've done the same thing myself a few times and things have worked well. Just make sure it was a hondata tune with 270's and not 310's or whatever the newer ones were. Also, the voltage breakpoints in the hondata tunes are different than link default so you have to adjust your axes in the link config or play with excel a bit
  8. Like
    cj got a reaction from Leo Briones in Jeep Cherokee with link g4 storm   
    There are a few things wrong in your tune, first up the ones that might cause it not to start
    1) you mention you are using a distributor, but the ignition config is set up for wasted spark. This must match what is physically there
    2) have you run the trigger1 calibration process? Have you tried adding/removing 360 from the calibrated number to check if you are firing on the exhaust stroke?
    other issues that wont help but are probably not the real root cause.
    The calibrations on your ECT, MAP, and probably IAT are all a bit suspect. Your MAP sensor should read the same as BAP with the engine off. Yours reads 15kpa higher. both IAT and ECT show ~40C which is really hot for ambient, but maybe normal in you part of the world, but, your ECT calibration maxes out at 100C which is no where near enough and probably means its incorrect. That your IAT matches this makes me question whether it's wrong too.
    Your fuel map is all 50's everywhere. try copying the fuel table from the monsoon example base map as a better starting point.
    ECT & MAP being off by small amounts & the fuel thing wont cause no-start, but it will cause it to run like a dog once it does.
  9. Like
    cj got a reaction from Gsab in G4+ Thunder engine bay installation issues   
    That's a pretty key piece of the puzzle there. 
    I've never engine bay mounted one, but have put them in some pretty cramped corners of cabins and the internal temps have stayed <40C so I dont think they generate enough heat on their own to cause a problem if you insulated it.
    Having another look at your pics, you could get a thin sheet of alloy and bolt it between the ECU and the engine, and have the front section run 45* across to behind the headlight so it blocks radiator air, kind of like a lot of people do to shield cold air intakes. You may even be able to run a ducting tube to pick up clean air and run it into the ECU side of the alloy sheild if its still getting a little bit hot.
  10. Like
    cj got a reaction from tiago in Not able to connect to Link G4+ after a bad wiring - Is it dead?   
    On subaru's the dash lights staying on after the key is turned off is usually caused by bad grounds, and it means a bunch of systems are grounding out through places they shouldnt be. 
    The real question is why did your fuse blow? if you overloaded a circuit with too big of a stereo thats one thing, but if you have a short somewhere still in the car all kinds of things could be happening.
    do you see the power LED on the link light up when you turn the key on? have you checked power & ground to the ECU is still ok?
  11. Like
    cj got a reaction from TechDave in help for porsche 986 2.5   
    So basic engine/idle theory... **assuming your trigger1 offset is correct**
    engine power output is from compressing & igniting fuel + air. The more fuel + air you have in the cylinder, the more potential power. The ignition angle (ie "when" you ignite the mixture in the 360* cycle) determines how much of that potential power is actually created. In 95%+ of petrol/ethanol engines, you "control" the air intake, and the computer/carb adds an appropriate amount of fuel to match.
    To have a stable idle, the engine output power (torque) must equal the amount required to keep the engine turning over. Any less & it stalls, any more and the revs increase.
    So the 2 levers you have to pull to get a stable idle (at any rpm) are
    1) how much air you let in
    2) what ignition angle you fire the spark plugs at
    You are only changing #2 here, but it sounds like you have #1 a bit off vs the factory specs. 25* ignition at idle is quite high, so I suggest you need to increase the air flow at idle - either idle stop screw on the throttle, or increase the idle control settings in the ECU to allow more air. You will then see your idle jump up to higher rpm, and when you reduce the ignition table values it should come back down. I cant give you exact values, but typical factory ignition idle angles are usually in the 10-20* range, and in your case it sounds like the manual says 5*. You dont have to match this exactly as your idle numbers can also differ from factory, but its usually a reasonable starting point.
    You are extremly unlikely to have knock or other spark related damage at idle speeds, so there is no real "dangerous" ignition number for idle, its just what works well for your car. Knock only becomes an issue as the engine comes under mid-high load (note that low rpm can still be high load however when you press the throttle hard)
  12. Like
    cj got a reaction from cruz177 in help for porsche 986 2.5   
    your ignition table itself looks like a good starting point
    the trigger1 offset you have to find yourself with a timing light as suggested by Adam. It can be different on each engine so we cant tell you exactly what number to use. remember to press enter after typing in an offset to get it to stick.
    As for your idle issue, maybe fuelling? Can you post a log of it happening please? Also disable launch control, its set to "on with DI4/clutch switch" so may be on accidentally which will pull 10deg of timing and other things unhelpful to idle.
    Unlikely to be your idle problem but I suspect there is something wrong with your oil temp sensor (shows a reading of -33C when ECT & IAT are both ~20C), and you engine compartment temp gauge is reading in KPA because of its calibration, which makes no sense at all.
  13. Like
    cj got a reaction from Adamw in G4+ Fury first tune 2gr-fe Turbo 92 MR2   
    you have fuel pressure problems. Either your pump isnt working or your FP sensor is dead. Your tune uses FP sensor as a input to the fuel table (which is good) but its reading 0-2psi for the entire of both of those logs. The car therefore thinks you have no fuel pressure and is running the injectors flat out.
    If the sensor is right, your fuel pump isnt on, if the sensor is faulty, you'll be running is crazy rich. Either way, fix the fuel sensor on ANVolt6.
  14. Like
    cj got a reaction from evoleo in Evo 6 jerky coming off throttle   
    Narrowband lambda sensors are borderline useless for tuning - they just show rich or lean, but not a usable number. Interestingly yours reads lean for that entire log which is possible given you dont see any boost, but its a bit unlikely. A wideband sensor would make any tuning (outside of a dyno with its own sensors) a lot easier. 
    What fuel pressure was this tuned at? The dead times used are for 45psi, and you are running very small pulse widths so this will have a big impact on low throttle/idle performance. You also dont have any short pulse adders configured, which will also really help given the low pulse widths.
    try putting in the 1050x data from here http://help.injectordynamics.com/support/solutions/articles/4000074340-link-engine-management
  15. Thanks
    cj got a reaction from Adamjames1 in 4.4 v8 vdo bmw throttle body   
    result number 1 in google search for 350z pedal pinout looks good
    https://my.prostreetonline.com/2014/09/24/test-vq35-accelerator-pedal/
  16. Thanks
    cj got a reaction from evoleo in Evo 6 jerky coming off throttle   
    As a starting point set a speed threshold on your idle ignition timing (maybe around 10kph). Also drop the rpm threshold for this to somewhere around 1500. Whats happening right now is that as soon as you get off the gas pedal ignition idle turns on and immediately pulls all your ignition timing.

    There are probably a bunch more contributing factors I havent had time to check yet. Do you have a lambda sensor installed? its showing 0 the whole log. Also, can you please include injector effective pulse width as a logged parameter & fuel table 1 value? Or better yet set it to log all values if its a PC log.
  17. Thanks
    cj got a reaction from 928sg in Fuel Pressure Sensor recommendations   
    have a look on mouser or digikey for honeywell PX2 or PX3 sensors. They come in various fittings including 1/8-27npt and pressure ranges up to 10bar. One of them is brass body and the other stainless but are otherwise very similar. Try to get the ones with Nitrile o-rings in them. Nitrile handles contact with fuel better. The spec sheet for these tells you which letter of the product code identifies the o-ring type. 
    Dont buy the chinese copies of these from aliexpress/ebay/etc. Even if they are accurate on day 1, they very quickly (a few weeks) become bascially random number generators. The genuine ones are reliable howver, and provide good data sheets that are easy to set up in the link calibrations
  18. Like
    cj got a reaction from Volcom86 in What is wrong with my tune?   
    Hi Simon,
    I didnt see your pclr file when I posted that info. After having a second look with the pclr loaded as well I can see what you mean about the fuel pressure. The pressure itself isnt technically a problem as 3.5bar is a pretty normal pressure level, however the flow rate, deadtimes and short pulse width tables are taken from the 3bar table in the ID1700 data instead of 3.5bar. The fuel flow number is probably the only one having a real impact here. Unfortunately you cant really change either these parameters or the fuel pressure without re-checking the entire fuel tune. Changing the fuel pressure down at the regulator is more likely to be acceptable given you have everything FP sensor controlled, but its still something you want to be careful with as you could cause it to go leaner under load.
    I can also now see what you mean about the -12% ish CL correction to your idle fuelling. you could try dropping the fuel table values for both table 1 &  table 2 at these cells & smoothing it into the cells near it. Better yet would be to disable CLL for a while. Go drive around smoothly for a bit (so there is constant load in each cell for a few seconds) then at the end of the run use the mixture map feature to adjust mostly table 2 (current E85 mixture means you are interpolating 90 odd % out of fuel table 2 so its really the only 1 that matters. Turn CLL back on after you've done this.
    CLL isnt active at cruise because the RPM high limit is set to 1500rpm. That being said, it still looks to me like at cruise RPM & TPS your lambda values are pretty close to target - between 0.94 & 1.0 which seems ok. If the CLL high rpm threshold was bumped up to around 3k or 3.5k this would probably correct itself. You would probably want to drop the TPS high threshold down to 50 or 70% so you dont run CLL under full throttle. It seems your fuelling is reasonable at full throttle, although there isnt much time spent at WOT in the log to be sure.
    For the cold start issues, you can try just upping the max idle valve % up to say 70 and see if this improves things. Your idle is a little below target at this point too so this might fix that.
    regarding the feeling of it still having power when off throttle, this wont be lambda related. Only things that cause this (apart from air leaks) are faulty/too small recirc valves, idle screw set too far open, idle valve numbers too high, or ignition advance too high. Easiest one to change is dropping the values in ign1 & 2 table for the row that represents your off-throttle MAP value. The lower you drop this the less power will be generated by the engine to "keep pushing the car". How long does this effect last for? your fuel cut is set to kick in after 0.2seconds which should cut power a lot.
    Your cruise log @ 26:54 shows fuel pressure dropping off a fair bit. You'd need to hold it at that level for a few seconds to see if it stablised or kept dropping off. Maybe the lines are too small? maybe low amperage at the pumps if its factory wiring?
  19. Like
    cj reacted to Richard Hill in Thunder lambda wiring - 12v   
    Here are some measurements from a single 4.9 Lambda sensor running on a Thunder on the bench.  The maximum the sensor drew was 1.43A  at the end of the heating phase 

  20. Like
    cj reacted to Richard Hill in Thunder lambda wiring - 12v   
    I have monitored the current draw of CAN lambdas during heat up phase several times from ambient, using low voltage (10 Volts and nominal Voltage 13.8) Basically on the edge of failure mode, The maximum current they draw is 1.5 Amps (worst case at low voltage) . reducing down to about 1 Amp when up to temperature.  I will post the Thunder current draw tomorrow when I can dig the values out.
  21. Like
    cj got a reaction from Simon in Engine fans don't turn on mr2link tst185   
    Which model car is this in? The sw20's factory wiring has the radiator fans controlled independently from the ecu - non AC models its just a temp switch in the radiator, AC models its a temp sensor that feeds back to the AC module and this controls the rad fans.
  22. Like
    cj got a reaction from Gsab in Link G4+ Fury E-throttle delay   
    Your high idle is caused by 2x things
    The first 4-5 seconds is because for the first 4.5 seconds after initial startup, the ecu adds the "startup step table" value to the TPS target. So instead of 7% TPS you run ~10% for 4.5 seconds then it goes back to normal ethrottle target at about 1400rpm. You probably want a bit of this behaviour but can tweak it down a little bit so its only adding 0.5 or 1% maybe. Fix this second once you have the base idle values correct.
    The second problem is that your base idle table is quite high, so in open loop idle you would be running 7-8% TPS which is why you get 1400-1500 rpm idle for the first 30 seconds or so. After that, closed loop idle control pulls enough% out of the target to lower your RPM to ~1200. At this point you are more in the 4.5-5% TPS range. Remember TPS target is ethrottle table value + base idle value + any other values. "3% base idle step" does not mean 3% of your target number (ie 3% of 5%), it means 3+5 = 8%. To fix this, i would take 2% off either all cells in your base idle table, or 2% off all values in the 0 row of your ethrottle target table. Either change will means your open loop idle is ~5% where it needs to be, and so closed loop will have very little to modify. This will also mean your inital startup TPS% is 2% lower, which may be enough to fix that issue as well, hence why you fix this first.
  23. Like
    cj got a reaction from immy21 in 3uz throttle map   
    look up the wikipedia article for PID tuning. There is a gif on the page about half way down that changes to show the effect of increasing P, I and D values. Very roughly, P is how quickly it reacts (how quickly it applies motor current), I is the aggressiveness (how much current it applies), and D is like a smoothing filter. None of these descriptions is technically correct but it can be a lot easier to understand to this way than fully understanding the maths behind it.
    I had noticed that your TPS response was a bit slow in general compared to your AP - about 200-250ms, which has got to be noticeable when driving. Here's the process i've used to tweak ethrottle PID's in the past (in case the 1uz settings dont give you the feel you want, or you just want to understand "why" a bit better):
    without the engine running, set "run mode when stalled" to "run throttle"
    set your ethrottle target table so AP0% = TPS20%, then interpolate up to AP100% = TPS80%. ie your TPS will only span between 20% and 80% open with full accel pedal travel. 
    probably store the ECU config at this point. It gives you a safe point to return to if you have to cut power a abort testing later on.
    go to the logging window in pclink, start a log, and make APS main and TPS main the only 2 parameters visible (or at least the only 2 in one of the groups)
    press the accel pedal slowly a few times then quickly a few times, then quickly but only to 1/2 or 1/4 pedal travel and notice how much delay you see between the AP line and the TP line. 
    now go to the ethrottle PID numbers and bump up P by 1 and repeat the tests. What you are looking for is minimal delay between the AP line moving and the TP line starting to follow it. At this stage dont worry about overshoot too much, just bump it up towards 8 or 9 until you stop seeing much improvement. dont go past 9 though.
    Make some notes as you go about what numbers you are testing. If you get the throttle to the point its just oscillating and wont stop after a second or 2, turn the ignition off, start again at slightly less aggressive numbers. 
    Now you basically play D off against I. D you increase or decrease by 1 or 2 points at a time. I by 0.02 or so. If the TP response looks "lazy" - ie its heading towards the AP line but starts to taper off before catching up to it (so TP gets to within 1-2% of AP and the takes a second to get the last bit), lower D until that tapering off point is really close to the AP line. If you see the TP line overshoot the AP line and oscilate a few times before settling down or if it doesnt stop oscillating at all, increase D until you only have no overshoot or maybe a single small overshoot then it stablises at the AP line. 
    To evaluate I, looks at whether the angle of the TP line matches that of the AP line when you press the pedal. If TP isnt a sharp enough angle, ie its heading in the right direction but not steeply enough, increase I (by a tiny bit). If TP likes to overshoot the target/AP by more than a couple percentage points, then lower I a bit. Note: this is why you tweaked the throttle target table to between 20 and 80 - you cant normally see overshoot below 0 or above 100. 
    You'll likely see overshoot worst when making large quick changes, and you'll see lazy response worse when making small slow changes. 
    When you have numbers you are happy with, put the throttle target table back to its normal values and save everything.
    Regarding the APS and TPS calibration failures, you can do this manually by hooking up all 4x sensors but leaving your existing voltage values in place, setting ethtrottle to "quiet mode" mode, and pull off your intake pipe so you can manually move the throttle blade. start a log, then press the pedal all the way down, hold it for a couple seconds, then release for a couple seconds. repeat 2 or 3 times. Now push the throttl blade all the way open and hold it, then all the way shut (you need to press it shut, they like to sit at 3-4% when left alone), repeat a couple times. Now add parameters to your log view for AN 1, 5, 6, 7 - these are the raw voltages from the APS and TPS sensors. have a look at the min and max values for each sensor and enter these manually into the APS and TPS calibration screens. Also note if either of the SUB sensors doesnt have a full range of travel (ie it flatlines above 70% or something), you need to enter the main% value when the sub% stops increasing if this happens too.
    You should now be able to switch to "run when stalled" throttle mode and run another log, but this time look at APS main, sub, TPS main, sub, and you should see all 4 tracking between 0 and 100% together (subject to a littel bit of latency in the TP numbers depending on how well your PID's are tuned).
  24. Like
    cj got a reaction from OCook in Engine harness rewire, now won’t start.   
    grab a trigger scope while cranking. Lets see if its seeing a good crank signal
  25. Like
    cj got a reaction from sama in G4+ Supra 2JZ PNP   
    sounds like progress. Next thing then is to figure out what FP control settings will make it behave properly. 
    Try changing the polarity of aux2 to high and see if the problem get better/worse. 
    can you hear the fuel pump at idle? Maybe have someone put their head in the boot and check? I'd be tempted to disconnect aux 2 from the ecu temporarily (cut the wire, un-pin it from a connector anywhere between ECU and FP controller), then at idle (so pump is running), connect it to ground, then floating, then 12v and see which connection makes the pumps jump up into high flow mode. From there you can work out what to configure in the ECU, or if you need to add a relay to deliver the right voltage.
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